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Ask the doctor: shoulder injuries

Ask the doctor: shoulder injuries
Ask the doctor: shoulder injuries
Dr. Moen specializes in the comprehensive care of the shoulder, with a focus on the arthroscopic, replacement, and reconstructive surgical treatment of shoulder disorders. Dr. Moen also has received specific training in the surgical and non-surgical care of athletic and sports injuries of the elbow.

Dr. Moen specializes in the comprehensive care of the shoulder, with a focus on the arthroscopic, replacement, and reconstructive surgical treatment of shoulder disorders. Dr. Moen also has received specific training in the surgical and non-surgical care of athletic and sports injuries of the elbow.

Shoulder injuries are a common but problematic issue for athletes and non-athletes alike. The top three causes of shoulder injuries are falls and accidents, sports injuries and wear and tear. The composition of the shoulder also makes it vulnerable to injury.

The shoulder is a modified ball and socket joint, and the rotator cuff is the group of four muscles that work to keep the ball in the socket. The rotator cuff is subject to wear and tear from everyday activity, and the wear and tear process begins to accelerate around age 50.

A variety of conditions can cause the cuff to wear out and tear. Additionally, the rotator cuff can become completely detached from the bone as a result of severe wear and tear, injury or a combination of both. Not all rotator cuff tears require surgery, and many can be treated with non-surgical measures such as medications, physical therapy and/or cortisone injections. If you are having shoulder pain, visit an orthopaedic surgeon to see what treatment options are available.

Shoulder injuries can be challenging to prevent. Many shoulder injuries occur as a result of a fall or accident, which can be difficult if not impossible to avoid.

The shoulder is vulnerable to arthritis, similar to the other joints in the body. However, the shoulder joint has the distinction of being almost like three joints in one. The glenohumeral (the actual ball and socket joint), the acromioclavicular joint (the joint between the clavicle and the shoulder blade) and the sternoclavicular joint (the joint between the clavicle and the breast bone) compose the shoulder, and all can be affected by arthritis.

If you begin to experience pain in your shoulder or fear you could have injured it from a recent fall or accident, consult an orthopaedic specialist to determine the cause of your pain and a course of treatment to prevent further damage.